Can you house train an Italian greyhound?

I live in a two bedroom apartment without a balcony. I want a dog and research tells me that Italian greyhounds are great for apartment living. I like the look and demenour of this breed. Are they ok in an apartment and can they be house trained? Anyone with experience?

All dogs can be housetrained – the question is more are you prepared to be dedicated, consistent and patient, and stick to a routine until it’s cracked, even if it takes months? Whilst some people may find toy and small breeds slightly more difficult to housebreak because of smaller bladder size, those factors all play a much larger part than breed.

Iggies can be great in apartments, as long as they’re being provided with stimulation, and given plenty of exercise outdoors. Properly exercised and trained, few dogs will be hyperactive indoors.
The I.G parent club can provide more comprehensive and specific information about the breed, including health concerns and training tips. Contact the club secretary and they can recommend good books and literature for first-time owners: http://www.italiangreyhound.org/

7 comments

  1. La Comtesse De Whippet says:

    All dogs can be housetrained – the question is more are you prepared to be dedicated, consistent and patient, and stick to a routine until it’s cracked, even if it takes months? Whilst some people may find toy and small breeds slightly more difficult to housebreak because of smaller bladder size, those factors all play a much larger part than breed.

    Iggies can be great in apartments, as long as they’re being provided with stimulation, and given plenty of exercise outdoors. Properly exercised and trained, few dogs will be hyperactive indoors.
    The I.G parent club can provide more comprehensive and specific information about the breed, including health concerns and training tips. Contact the club secretary and they can recommend good books and literature for first-time owners: http://www.italiangreyhound.org/
    References :

  2. liz F says:

    i work as a trainer at a dog kennel and any dog can be crate trained and potty trained it just depends on how hard you enforce this and how many times you take it out to go to the bathroom greyhounds are nice but really any dog would be fine
    References :

  3. tilcevol says:

    soltanto se parlate italiano adeguato, lentamente.

    ma ricordi prego che indossano per non mangiare la pasta soltanto le polpette

    gracci
    References :

  4. Apacapacas says:

    Yes, Italian Greyhounds can be house trained and crate trained just like any other dog. But you have to take into consideration the size of the dog’s bladder and take him out to potty more often than you would have to take a larger dog. In the tips below, adjust the times to fit the size of the dog.

    One way you can help your dog to learn bladder and bowel control is to put her on a very rigid schedule.

    When you get up in the morning, take a treat (like a tiny bit of cheese) in your hand and take her on a leash for a walk around your backyard. Lead her to the place where you want her to do her business, and just wait while she sniffs around trying to find exactly the right spot. As soon as she squats, say, calmly, "go potty" or "hurry up" or "get busy" or whatever phrase you want to use as a command word. As soon as she’s done, say "Good hurry up" or "good potty" or "good busy" or "good" whatever phrase you chose to use, and give her the treat. Be sure to praise her effusively, but don’t let her jump up on you while you’re doing that. Then stay out in the yard with her for a few minutes so that she doesn’t get the idea that outside time stops as soon as she empties her bowels or bladder. When you get back inside, you can remove both the leash and the collar.

    Then feed her. Whatever she hasn’t eaten after about 15 minutes should be picked up and put away – she can’t learn to just dawdle over her meals. After she’s eaten, wait 15 – 30 minutes and then take her (and another treat) outside again. Remember it’s important that you go with her so that you can verify that she has indeed gone potty. Again, just as she squats, give her the command word, and just as she finishes, give her the praise and the treat. Again, stay out with her for a few minutes longer so she doesn’t think outside time stops when she does what you’ve asked her to do.

    After breakfast, if you have to go to work, put her in her crate with a toy to play with, and close the door. If you don’t have a crate for her, put her in a room with a tiled floor and close the door. If you put her in a room instead of in a crate, be sure to include a bowl of water. (I don’t know about all crates, but ours came with a water bowl attached. We got it from a friend, though, so I don’t know if crates come with them or you have to buy it separately. I don’t see them in the pictures in the catalogs, though.) Don’t forget her toy. And, if you like, put a wee-wee pad in the room. It’s scented so that she should be drawn to it when she has to go.

    If you don’t have to go to work, she will play for an hour or so, then probably nap for awhile. When she gets up, follow the same routine. Take her (with a treat in hand) on leash to the area in which you want her to go, wait til she squats, give the command word, wait til she finishes, give her the praise and the treat, then hang around outside for another few minutes.

    Dogs should be taken outside 15-20 minutes after every meal, and as soon as possible after they wake up from sleep, whether at night or during the day in a nap. Between times, don’t expect her to hold her urine for more than 30 minutes for each month of her life until she’s about 8 months old; at 3 months, that means no more than 1 1/2 hours, at 12 months, that means no more than 4 hours. If you find that she’s going more often than that, decrease the time you wait between outings.

    Be sure to clean up any spots she has wet or soiled in the house with a good enzymatic cleaner. There is one called Urine Gone that comes with a blue light so you can see the stains even when they aren’t visible to the naked eye (I don’t have any affiliation with the company that makes it). Some folks say you can use vinegar and baking soda. Put the vinegar on the spot, then sprinkle the baking soda on top. Wait for it to dry and then vacuum it up. I haven’t tried this myself, so I don’t know whether it will work or not.

    Never, ever scold her for making a mess in the house, especially if you don’t catch her at it. If you DO catch her, pick her up, tuck her tail between her legs, and take her outside to the designated area. Since she won’t be on leash this time, take her back inside when she’s done.

    If you don’t catch her at it, and you scold her, she is likely to think that it is the very act of pottying that you disapprove of. Because she goes in so many different places in the house, she won’t know that you object to the location instead of the act, and she’s likely to start hiding or going into another room.

    Be sure her meals, playtimes, and exercise happen at the same time each day.

    Don’t expect this regimen to work overnight, but within a few weeks, she should have a pretty good grasp of it. Then and only then – after she has stopped going in the house – you can teach her how to let you know when she has to go. Some people have their dogs scratch at the back door, others have them ring bells hanging from the wall beside the door, and still others have their dogs just come and sit beside them and wait. You’ll have to choose the method that works best for you and for your dog.

    Hope this works for you! good luck!
    References :
    Experience with my own dogs

  5. Michelle B says:

    I have also heard of Iggies (Italian greys) being box/litter trained. Also, did you know that greyhounds are actually good apartment dogs? I adopted mine at 4 1/2 years old; they live 12-15 years. They actually require LESS activity than people think. Plus, being larger, they have larger bladders! LOL Good luck!!!
    References :

  6. Tiffany V says:

    My Italian Greyhound is perfectly housetrained. It takes time and attention (maybe a little more attention than other dogs) but it is absolutely possible. I took her out every hour to the same spot outside and said "go potty!" until she did. Then she got a treat and lots of praise. She now will go potty in the same exact area, everytime, which makes clean-up a breeze!

    Good luck!
    References :

  7. tara S says:

    from what I’ve heard and read it is very hard . I wish you the best of luck
    References :

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